HOME   CONTACT   CONVERTER   VIDEO   TECHNICAL 

 

Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

Kymco

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Richman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Ural
Velocette

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

KTM 990 Adventure R Dakar

 

 

 

 

Make Model

KTM 990 Adventure R Dakar Replica

Year

2011

Engine

Liquid cooling, four stroke, 75°V-twin cylinder, DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder

Capacity

999.8
Bore x Stroke 101 x 62.4mm
Compression Ratio 11.5;1

Induction

Keihin Electronic Fuel Injection EMS

Ignition  /  Starting

-  /  electric
Clutch Wet Multi-disc hydraulically operated,

Max Power

113.3 hp 84.5 kW @ 8750 rpm

Max Torque

100 Nm @ 6500 rpm

Transmission  /  Drive

6 Speed  /  chain
Frame Tubular cromoly spaced frame. powered coated

Front Suspension

48mm WP USD forks 255mm wheel travel.

Rear Suspension

WP-PDS rear shock, hydraulic spring preload. 265mm wheel travel.

Front Brakes

2x 300mm discs 2 piston calipers

Rear Brakes

Single 240mm disc 1 piston caliper

Front Tyre

90/80 -21

Rear Tyre

150/70 -R18
Seat Height 915 mm

Dry-Weight

207 kg  /  456.34 lbs

Fuel Capacity 

19.5 Litres   /  5.8 gal

Consumption  average

17.2 km/lit

Standing ¼ Mile  

12.0 sec

Top Speed

210.7 km/h

 

What better way for a bike maker renowed for the way it builds its endurance machines than to honor the riders (and drivers) which take part in what once was the world's most challenging rally? Enter the 990 Adventure Dakar, a slightly re-engineered bike made up from the Adventure and Adventure R versions.

“The Dakar will always remain the Dakar - even if it takes place in South America,” says KTM. Truth be told, the bike manufacturer has won its share of titles. Most of them thanks to the riders and the engine used on the Dakar KTM entries.

The unit fitted onto the 990 Adventure Dakar is a 999cc V-75 Twin engine, which develops 115 bhp the same engine as the one used on the Adventure R. The powerplant is linked to a 6 speed transmission controlled with the help of a hydraulically operated, wet multi-disc clutch.

The brakes of the bike are being controlled with the help of a Bosch ABS, while Adventure-based suspensions with 210 mm of travel insure a smooth ride read as smooth as possible, given the fact that the bike has been built as a Dakar rally tribute.

Source HFL

 

Motorcycle.com review

They say: “To the end of the world.”
We say: “And the ends of the earth!”
KTM 990 Adventure Dakar Edition Jpg
A foldaway knob below the seat makes dialing-in spring preload on the linkageless WP-PDS s

KTM has taken a narrow view of broadband adventure travel—just what you’d expect from a factory with 11 Dakar Rally wins. This 75-degree LC8 V-twin is more civilized than the one that earned win number two a decade ago under the late Fabrizio Meoni, or the original 2003 950 Adventure. It’s not particularly kind or gentle, but that’s a good thing since a lot of this third rock from the sun isn’t, either.

After bumping that first 942cc motor to 999cc in ’06, KTM coined this one in ’09 to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Thierry Sabine’s inaugural North African epic: a fusion of the standard Adventure and the more off-road oriented Adventure R. Its velour-upholstered seat is a bit closer to ground level, and orange powder-coated crash bars really do protect the bodywork from harm. It’s narrow in all the right places, and most of its 527 lbs.—42 fewer than a BMW R1200GS—are strategically situated to make the Dakar feel at least 50 lbs. lighter than it is.

A thumb on the starter button cues enough bark from those underseat mufflers to keep things interesting. Easing onto the freeway, the skinny seat and matching windscreen define roomy-but-austere accommodations. Split between its two tanks, 5.3 gallons of unleaded could take you 240 miles non-stop.

Despite its incongruous appearance, the 990’s light steering, unflappable chassis and acres of cornering clearance let it make short work of twisty detours. Standard Pirelli universals squirm under heavy cornering loads, but still stick better than most. Brakes have plenty of feel and sufficient power for the street without delivering too much in the dirt. Bosch/Brembo ABS steps in when you need it, and can be switched off when you don’t.

The LC8 loves to spin. It lays down about 95 rear-wheel Lipizzaners at 8750 rpm via an excellent six-speed tranny and a tough, communicative clutch. Other big Adventures are as good or better elsewhere, but add a suitable set of knobbies and this one makes them all disappear once the pavement does. Rapid progress requires a disciplined throttle hand. The superb WP fork and shock swallow things that would swallow less capably suspended machines whole. Given the right signals through bars and pegs, the long, tall chassis is at least as accurate off-road as on. Beyond that, everything works and nothing gets in your way. So? If the question is what’s the best ride for conducting serious business in obscure corners of Planet Earth’s 57.5 million square miles of terra firma, the answer starts with KTM. MC

Source Motorcycle.com

 

 

 

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.  

 Privacy Policy       Contact Me      Links