HOME   CONTACT   CONVERTER   VIDEO   TECHNICAL 

 

Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

Kymco

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Richman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Ural
Velocette

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

Ducati 916

 

 

 

 

Make Model

Ducati 916

Year

1994

Engine

Four stroke, 90°“L”twin cylinder, DOHC, desmodromic 4 valve per cylinder. 

Capacity

916
Bore x Stroke 94 x 66 mm
Cooling System Liquid cooled,
Compression Ratio 11.0:1

Induction

Weber electronic indirect injection
Lubrication Wet sump
Engine Oil Synthetic, 15w-50

Ignition 

Electronic I.A.W                   
Starting Electric

Max Power

109 hp / 79.6 kW @ 9000 rpm 
Max Power Rear Tyre 101.3 hp @ 8900 rpm

Max Torque

90 Nm / 9 kgf-m 66.3 lb/ft @ 7000 rpm

Transmission 

6 Speed 
Final Drive Chain
Frame Steel, Trellis frame

Front Suspension

43 mm adjustable Showa inverted fork,
Front Wheel Travel 127 mm / 5 in

Rear Suspension

Progressive linkage with adjustable monoshock
Rear Wheel Travel 130 mm / 5.1 in

Front Brakes

2x 320mm  discs 4 piston calipers

Rear Brakes

Single 220 disc 2 piston caliper

Front Tyre

120/70 ZR17

Rear Tyre

190/50 ZR17
Dimensions

Length 2095 mm / 79.1 in

Width   690 mm / 27.2 in

Height  1090 mm / 42.9 in

Wheelbase 1410 mm / 56.6 in
Seat Height 790 mm / 31.1 in

Dry-Weight

198 kg   /  436.5 lb
Wet-Weight 204 kg / 449.8 lbs

Fuel Capacity

17 Litres / 4.4 gal
Reserve 4 Litres

Consumption  average

18.5 km/lit

Braking 60 - 0 / 100 - 0

12.9 m / 39.9 m

Standing ¼ Mile  

10.6 sec / 207.4 km/h

Top Speed

255.1 km/h
Manuals  Ducati 916  /  Motor Deutschland

 

Rarely has a motorcycle combined style and speed to such devastating effect as Ducati's 916. The Italian V-twin's blend of breathtaking beauty, thunderous engine performance and sublime handling made it an instant hit on the bike's launch in 1994. By the end of the decade. 916-based machines had won a string of World Superbike titles. Meanwhile the roadster went from strength to strength, its engine enlarged but its look proudly intact. The 916 was a development of the liquid-cooled, eight-valve desmodromic V-twin line that stretched back to the 851 of 1988. More than simply aerodynamic, designer Massimo Tamburini's creation was inspired. The fairing's sharp nose held aggressive twin headlights. Elegant scarlet shapes were everywhere in the fuel tank and fairing.

The rear end. with its diminutive tailpiece, high-level silencers and single-sided swingarm, was equally dramatic. Ducati's 916cc motor was a bored-out version of the unit from the previous 888 model. Other changes included a revised Weber fuel-injection system plus the addition of a larger, curved radiator. Breathing was uprated with a large airbox fed by intakes running back from the fairing nose. In combination with a new exhaust system, this raised the eight-valve motor's peak output by a few horsepower to 114bhp at 9000rpm.
Chassis design combined Ducati's traditional steel ladder frame with a tubular aluminium rear subframe. The 916 differed from the 888 by using a second rear engine mount for extra rigidity. There was nothing traditional about the aluminium swingarm that curved round the huge 190-section rear tyre before swooping back to anchor the three-spoke wheel. Tamburini admitted that this was not the purest engineering solution, but considered the compromise worthwhile for the boost ii brought to the bike's high-tech image.

Neat engineering
There was more neat engineering a( the steering head, which featured adjustable geometry plus a horizontally mounted steering damper. More conventionally, the swingarm worked a vertical. multi-adjustable Showa shock. The Japanese firm also provided the 43mm upside-down forks, which held a 17-inch from wheel. Braking was by Brembo. Ducati's eight-valve engine had long been a torquey, charismatic powcrplanl. and the 916 unit was the best yet. Its mid-range response was majestic, sending the bike rocketing out of corners from as low as 5000rpm to the accompaniment of a spine-tingling exhaust growl. High-rev acceleration was smooth and strong, too. sending the 916 to a top speed of I60mph (257km/h). Handling was superb, justifying Ducati's decision to slick with a steel frame, after considering a switch to aluminium. At 4291b (195kg) the 916 was light, its frame was rigid, and its suspension of high quality. Although the Ducati was not the quickest-Steering of superbikes. it had a confidence-inspiring blend of stability and neutral cornering feel. 
This most purposeful of Italian sportsters was not always an easy companion, especially in town, where its racy riding position, firm suspension and snatchy power delivery made life unpleasant. On the right road, though, the 916 was simply magical: one of those rare machines that left all those who rode it stunned by its unmatched combination of beauty, character and performance. Ducati's Superbike Dominance The roadgoing 916 was a hit in the showrooms, and Ducati's factory racebike of the same name was even more successful in the World Superbike championship. The red V-twins were the dominant force in the most prestigious four-stroke racing series, notably with Carl Fogarty. The British rider won in 1994 and again a year later. Australian ace Troy Corser retained the crown for Ducati in 1996 before Fogarty, who had left for Honda, returned to regain the title in 1998. His fourth championship, in 1999, made it five in six years for the Italian V-twin.
Source of review: Fast Bikes by Roland Brown

 

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.  

 Privacy Policy       Contact Me      Links