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Honda CBR 125R Repsol

 

   

 

Make Model

Honda CBR 125R Repsol

Year

2005

Engine

Liquid cooled, four stroke single cylinder, SOHC, 2 valve.

Capacity

124.7
Bore x Stroke 58 x 47.2 mm
Compression Ratio 11.0:1

Induction

28mm VK-type carb

Ignition  /  Starting

Capacitor Discharge (CDI)

Max Power

9.7 kW @ 10000 rpm

Max Torque

10.1 Nm @ 8000 rpm

Transmission  /  Drive

6 Speed  /  chain

Front Suspension

31mm telescopic fork, 109mm wheel travel.

Rear Suspension

Monoshock damper, 120mm wheel travel.

Front Brakes

Single 276mm disc 2 piston caliper

Rear Brakes

Single 220mm disc 1 piston caliper

Front Tyre

80/80 –17

Rear Tyre

100/80 –17

Dry-Weight

115 kg

Fuel Capacity 

10 Litres

Standing ¼ Mile  

19.9 sec

Top Speed

112.7 km/h

Review

The Honda CBR125 was Britain's top-selling motorcycle in 2005 – and it's easy to see why. It's styled like its CBR600RR and CBR1000RR stablemates, from its crisp-edged full fairing and dual "cat's eyes" headlights to the stepped seat and split tail light.

It's aimed at the "sixteener" market, most of whom are astonishingly knowledgable about top sports bikes and MotoGP racing machines – which is why it's also available, like the bike in our pictures, in the Repsol colours of double World champion Dani Pedrosa who is, let me remind you, little more than a schoolboy himself.

As far as image is concerned, Honda has pushed all the right buttons on this oneI would have given my eyeteeth for a fully-faired sports bike when I was sixteen.. I would have given my eye teeth for a fully faired sports bike when I was 16.

But what of the bike behind the hype; what's under the razor-sharp Baby 'Blade clothes? Well, a fairly low-tech, 124.7cc single with a carburettor rather than fuel-injection, one camshaft and only two valves, that's what.

Honda claims 9.7kW at 10 000rpm with 10Nm available at 8000rpm.

The trouble is, most of it is concentrated at the top of the rev range. The bike pulls away nicely with about 3500rpm on the clock but once you make the huge jump to second you need a lot of revs just to stay ahead of the traffic.

The CBR also doesn't like pulling up steep hills or into a sgtrong winds – both of which are in plentiful supply in here Cape Town. A couple of times I found myself going up Eastern Boulevard into the South-Easter with the engine buzzing at 8000 in third at around 70km/h; the bike simply wouldn't pull fourth under those conditionsIt keeps the plot under control even when going faster downhill than the bike's top speed on the flat..

For what it's worth, I coaxed the little 'Blade up to 109km/h at 10 500rpm in cool, still air on the flat; I could probably have got a little more by revving it out in fifth before popping it into top gear but mechanical sympathy intervened.

The little single begins to vibrate at the peak torque; the shakes continue through to peak revs, encouraging the rider to change up soon after 10. Probably deliberate, that.

The clutch feels like it came off a motocross bike, light but firm, with plenty of feedback and a solid hook-up at the end of its travel. It's easy to learn and lends itself to fuss-free take offs even in relatively inexperienced hands.

The six-speed gearebox is notchy at low revs but agreeably slick when all the shafts are spinning properly; lever travel is positive and commendably short - I'd have some scathing things to say if it weren't, on a single making less than 10kW.

I soon dispensed with the clutch when changing up except when going from first to second (the big gap made it very jerky) and got better results than with it. I was also pleasantly surprised by the absence of driveline lash.

Suspension

The non-adjustable front suspension (31mm conventional forks) is firm without being harsh, controlling the front wheel even on bad roads and delivering light, accurate steering at any speed the bike is capable of.

The rear wheel is monitored by a straight monoshock set-up without any linkages that seemed, as so often on small Oriental machines, a little underdamped for South African conditions (big rider, bad roads). Nevertheless, it keeps the plot under control even when going faster downhill than the bike's top speed on the flat.

The brakes are also a little basic, with floating callipers at both ends; the front brake, however, works very well although it demands a firm squeeze to get the most out of it.

The back brake is very good indeed; strong but not grabby, with plenty of feedback, well suited to an inexperienced 16-year-old hoof.

The seating position is not as radical as it looks; the rider sits fairly upright although his/her hands are a little close to the hip point, thanks to the bike's dinky 1294mm wheelebase.

Impressive mid-corner speeds

Despite the under-par rear suspension you can throw the CBR around on tight corners; at 115kg dry it lends itself to seriously late braking and it has enough ground clearance for impressive mid-corner speeds.

It certainly earns its family credentials in terms of rideability.

Am I describing a hooligan tool? Ultimately, no. The CBR125 lacks the power to get really naughty unless you rev the nuts off it and even then any of the 125cc two-stroke race replicas will make it look like a moped.

Grown-up features

What it has going for it is its looks, Honda build quality and durability, grown-up features such as electric start and a complete instrument panel with analogue dials for speed, revs, fuel level and coolant temperature – and at R22 500, price.

But only a schoolboy would enjoy commuting on a bike this intense, that's this much hard work to ride. The CBR is pointed with typical Honda accuracy right at its target market, which is why it's the UK's biggest seller.

Source Motoring .co.za 2005

 

 

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.  

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