HOME   CONTACT   CONVERTER   VIDEO   TECHNICAL 

 

Classic Bikes

Custom Bikes

Racing Bikes

 

AC Schnitzer

AJP

AJS

Alfer

Aprilia

Ariel

Arlen Ness

ATK

Bajaj

Bakker

Barigo

Benelli

Beta

Big Bear

BigDog

Bimota

BMS Choppers

BMW

Borile

Boss Hoss

Boxer

Brammo

Britten

BRP Can-am

BSA

Buell

Bultaco

Cagiva

Campagna

CCM

Confederate

CR&S

Daelim

Deus

Derbi

DP Customs

Drysdale

Ducati

Dunstall

Exile Cycles

Factory Bike

Fischer

Foggy Petronas

GASGAS

Ghezzi Brain

Gilera

Harris

Harley Davidson

HDT

Hesketh

Highland

Honda

HPN

Horex

Husqvarna

Husaberg

Hyosung

Indian

Italjet

Jawa

Kawasaki

KTM

Kymco

Laverda

Lazareth

Lehman Trikes

LIFAN

Magni

Maico

Matchless

Matt Hotch

Megelli

Midual

Mission

Mondial

Moto Guzzi

Moto Morini

MotoCzysz

Motus

Mr Martini

MTT

Münch

MV Agusta

MZ

NCR

Norton

Oberdan Bezzi

OCC

Paul Jr. Designs

Piaggio

Radical Ducati

Richman

Ridley

Roehr

Roland Sands

Royal Enfield

Rucker

Sachs

Saxon

Sherco

Suzuki

Titan

TM Racing

Triumph

Victory

Viper

Vincent

Vilner

VOR

Voxen

Vyrus

Wakan / Avinton

Walz

Wrenchmonkees

Wunderlich

Yamaha

Zero

   

Honda CB 750 Four K0

Four was sold from 1969 to 1970 and was available in one of three colors: Candy Blue Green, Candy Gold, or Candy Ruby Red. The tank, side covers, and upper forks were of the basic color (green, gold, or red). The headlight shell was also the basic color. The bike had a 4-into-4 throttle cable system. The exhaust system was a 4-into-4. The engine was a 736cc SOHC 2-valve dry sump inline 4 cylinder linked to a 5-speed transmission and chain drive. The serial number began CB750-1000001.

 

   

 

Make Model

Honda CB 750 Four K0

Year

1969

Engine

Air cooled, transverse four cylinder, four stroke, SOHC, 2 valve per cylinder.

Capacity

736
Bore x Stroke 61 х 63 mm
Compression Ratio 9.0:1

Induction

4x 28mm Keihin carbs

Ignition  /  Starting

-  /  electric & kick

Max Power

69 hp @ 8000 rpm

Transmission  /  Drive

5 Speed  /  chain
Frame Tubular steal duplex cradle

Front Suspension

Telescopic forks non adjustable.

Rear Suspension

Dual shocks, preload adjustable.

Front Brakes

Single 290mm disc

Rear Brakes

178mm Drum

Front Tyre

3.25-19

Rear Tyre

4.00-18

Dry-Weight

239 kg

Fuel Capacity 

17.1 Litres

Standing ¼ Mile  

13.5 sec / 100.9 mp/h

Top Speed

124.3 mp/h
Manual Honda4fun.com

Honda's 750-four was the original superbike; the machine that redefined the limits of motorcycle performance almost overnight. Actually born in the Sixties  it was unveiled at the Tokyo Show in October 1968, and released in limited numbers the following year - the CB750 dominated the early Seventies and had a huge influence on the machines that followed it. Until the arrival of the Honda, with its broad bank of aircooled cylinders and four shining mufflers, mass-produced fours simply did not exist.

The CB750 changed all that and went further, combining its basic appeal with a competitive price that included refinements such as a disc front brake and electric starter.  It was the Honda's engine that created all the impact. The angled-forward 736cc unit's design used many lessons learnt during Honda's days of racing multi-cylinder machines in the Sixties, although the roadster relied on a single overhead camshaft and two valves per cylinder, in contrast to the racers with their twin cams and four valves per pot.

The CB750's output of 67bhp was mighty impressive at the time, though, as were the smoothness and reliability with which it was delivered. The CB was designed as an all-rounder, with a view to sales in the important American market, but was good for over 120mph despite its high, wide handlebars.  Handling, however, was only adequate, with the flex-prone steel frame and harsh suspension later coming in for criticism. But in the excitement of the CB's arrival few riders were put off by that - especially after veteran Dick Mann had proved the four's sporting potential by winning at Daytona in 1970.

Honda sat on their laurels a little, barely updating the 750 even when Kawasaki launched the faster 900cc Z1 four years later. In fact, the CB was detuned slightly over the years to reduce emissions. When Honda finally revamped it in 1976 with the so-called Super Sports CB750F - complete with flat handlebars, bright yellow paint and a four-into-one exhaust — the new bike's top speed was only 115mph. 

The single-cam CB750 soldiered on for a full decade, finally being replaced by the 16-valve CB750K-a disastrous bike that combined poor handling with a series of mechanical problems. Bui the memory of that first great superbike remains with the faithful. 

Source of review: Roland Brown

One of the most significant machines in recent motorcycling history, the CB750 Four featured a 4-cylinder engine reminiscent of the Honda RC racers. The 750 Four had a terrific exhaust note resonating from four exhausts and, in a first for a production motorcycle, a top speed of over 200 km/h (~125mph). The incredible 750cc 4-cylinder engine featured a wealth of technology developed from sixties era GP racers.

Features included Honda's first one-piece crankshaft, a dry sump design and a level of reliability never before seen. Like the RC racers, the CB750 was a high-rpm, high-power machine kicking out an un-heard of 67 HP at 8,000rpm. Harnessing this impressive power was an RC-type double-cradle frame and, in another breakthrough, a front disc brake.

Other components, like tires and chains, were also of especially high quality. The CB750 brought a new level of performance and sophistication to the world of motorcycles, making it an instant top seller. Truly, this was a machine that changed the history of motorcycling.

 

 

 

NOTE: Any correction or more information on these motorcycles will kindly be appreciated, Some country's motorcycle specifications can be different to motorcyclespecs.co.za. Confirm with your motorcycle dealer before ordering any parts or spares. Any objections to articles or photos placed on motorcyclespecs.co.za will be removed upon request.  

 Privacy Policy       Contact Me      Links