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Nimbus

 

 

 

 

The Nimbus model C motorcycle was manufactured in Denmark between 1934 and 1959 by Fisker & Nielsen in Copenhagen. The company started in 1906 manufacturing electrical motors.
 

Nimbus Model A “Stovepipe”

In 1919 the first Nimbus motorcycle, model A, or “Stovepipe” as it was nicknamed, saw the light of day. The model A & B were manufactured between 1919 and 1928.

In 1934 the model C was introduced and Fisker & Nielsen turned out more than 12,000 model C Nimbuses over the next 25 years, of which 25% to 30% were sold to the Danish military, police and postal service.

Specifications

The Nimbus has a 4 cylinder in-line, air cooled, SOHC engine with a 746cc displacement and it generates between 18 and 22 horses, all depending on the type of pistons and shape of the single head. It was the first motorcycle ever manufactured with telescopic front forks, although only by a few months before the German BMW. It is also an original “hard-tail” with the only type of rear suspension consisting of either coil springs or rubber bands on the seat mounts. The reason for this is that these motorcycles have a direct shaft drive, no chain or belt on this bike.

The most notable thing about these bikes however, is the fact that the engine has no valve covers. This means that as the engine is running one can actually follow the movement of the 8 intake and exhaust valves, springs and rocker arms. The motorcycle can still reach speeds of 75 mph when geared for solo riding and about 55-60 mph when geared for sidecar.

Still Going Strong

There are still about 3800-4000 of these motorcycles registered in Denmark today, not including the ones not registered for the road, and it is estimated that at least 6500-7000 of these old classic bikes are still in existence around the world today. This is a great testament to the durability of these 50 to 70 year old motorcycles, as well as to the love of riding and maintaining these great Danish bikes by their owners.

It is estimated that there are about 200-250 of these motorcycles in North America, with 50 of them being registered between members of the Chicago’s Mid-West Nimbus club and our Nimbus Club USA.

Source nimbusclubusa.com